Clinical Trials

COMBAT

http://www.denverhealth.org/for-professionals/clinical-specialties/trauma-center/research-and-publications/combattrial

Bleeding is the most avoidable cause of death in trauma patients. Up to one-third of severely injured trauma patients are found to be coagulopathic and forty percent of the mortality following severe injury is due to uncontrollable hemorrhage in the setting of coagulopathy. It has been established that early administration of fresh frozen plasma decreases mortality following severe injury, replacing lost coagulation factors, improving the coagulopathy and restoring blood volume. This study will determine if giving plasma to severely injured trauma patients during ambulance transport versus after arrival to the hospital will help reduce hemorrhage, thus decreasing both total blood product administration and mortality.

Contact: Ernest E Moore, MD ernest.moore@dhha.org

MAYO PILOT STUDY

TEXT AND LINK PENDING

PAMPER

https://crisma.upmc.com/apps/PAMPer/home/

Background: Although advances in the care of the severely injured patient have occurred over the last decade, patients continue to be plagued with uncontrolled hemorrhage resulting in significant early mortality and the development of multiple organ failure and associated complications. A primary driving force for this unbridled hemorrhage has been shown to be the early coagulopathy which complicates severe injury. Increasing evidence suggests that blood component transfusion protocols that address this early coagulopathy, once a patient arrives at a trauma center, are associated with lower mortality and a reduction in blood component transfusion requirements. Prehospital interventions which quell this early coagulopathy in an earlier setting have the potential to minimize or even prevent this vicious hemorrhagic cascade, further lowering blood component transfusion requirements and reducing the resultant morbid sequelae which complicates severe injury.

Contact: Jason L Sperry, MD,MPH sperryjl@upmd.edu

STAAMP

https://crisma.upmc.com/apps/STAAMP/

Traumatically injured patients continue to be plagued with uncontrolled hemorrhage resulting in significant morbidity and early mortality. A primary driving force for this unbridled hemorrhage is known to be the early coagulopathy which complicates severe injury. Trauma induced coagulopathy has been postulated to be an equilibrium imbalance between pro and anticoagulant factors, platelets, endothelium and fibrinolysis soon after injury. Recent evidence demonstrates that the early use of the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid (TXA) after trauma center arrival results in improved survival in patients at risk for bleeding. Bringing this proven treatment to the prehospital arena and intervening earlier in those patients who would otherwise not be candidates for treatment has the real potential to further reduce or prevent the vicious hemorrhagic cascade, improve clinical outcomes and provide insight into the underlying mechanisms responsible for and which maximize its benefit.

Contact: Jason L Sperry, MD,MPH sperryjl@upmd.edu