Biosketches

Overall Project Leadership
bios_esmonI have experience in coagulation, inflammation, vascular biology and particularly the protein C pathway. We routinely develop new assays and antibodies useful for such investigations.

I have experience in coagulation, inflammation, vascular biology and particularly the protein C pathway. We routinely develop new assays and antibodies useful for such investigations.

We identified histones as major mediators of sepsis, activated protein C as a critical regulator of the septic response and have identified a number of approaches to interrupt complex disease progression. We have generated a battery of antibodies to interfere with histone mediated toxicity and have antibodies that block protein C completely or selectively inhibit the anticoagulant function. In collaborative studies, we have that shown high levels of histones in trauma patients correlate with poor outcome. I have experience as head of the cardiovascular biology and coagulation biology program, I have been head of program projects and participated in SCOR grants and my laboratory is accustomed to working collaboratively with laboratories at different universities around the world. I am currently the principal investigator of the inflammation component of the TACTIC grant (#UM1 HL120877) studying trauma-induced coagulopathy.

bios_morrisseyDr. James Morrissey is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds the Roy & Eva Hong Professorship in Molecular & Cellular Biology. Dr. Morrissey received his Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego and did postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford and the Scripps Research Foundation.

Dr. James Morrissey is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds the Roy & Eva Hong Professorship in Molecular & Cellular Biology. Dr. Morrissey received his Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego and did postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford and the Scripps Research Foundation.

Starting with cloning of tissue factor in 1987, Dr. Morrissey’s research has centered on regulation of the blood clotting system in normal hemostasis and thrombotic diseases. These studies initially focused on basic biochemical mechanisms in the blood clotting system, but over time several of his discoveries have prompted translational studies in both animal models and human clinical studies. In 2006, his laboratory discovered that inorganic polyphosphate, which is released from activated human platelets, is a potent modulator of the blood clotting system at the nexus of hemostasis, thrombosis and inflammation. The work from his lab has led to a number of spin-offs with potential clinical applications, including novel clinical assays for markers of thrombotic risk, hemostatic agents for treating bleeding, and anti-inflammatory/anti-thrombotic agents with potential for reduced bleeding side effects.

Dr. Morrissey is a member of several profession societies and serves on the Council of the International Society of Thrombosis & Haemostasis (ISTH). His awards and named lectureships include an Established Investigatorship from the American Heart Association, the Owren Lecture (University of Oslo), the Theodore Spaet Memorial Lecture (Montefiore Medical Center), Biennial Investigator Recognition Award for Contributions to Haemostasis (ISTH), and the Sol Sherry Distinguished Lecture in Thrombosis (American Heart Association). He has published more than 170 scientific papers and has served on the editorial boards of several journals including the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Blood, and Thrombosis and Haemostasis. He is the inventor on 16 U.S. patents, several of which have been licensed in the field of diagnostics for hemostasis and thrombosis.

bios_tracyI have directed the University of Vermont’s Laboratory for Clinical Biochemistry Research since it began in 1986. As a Diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry, I developed the LCBR to adhere to the highest standards of quality, while staying on the forefront of biomarker development and implementation in epidemiology and clinical trial research.

I have directed the University of Vermont’s Laboratory for Clinical Biochemistry Research since it began in 1986. As a Diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry, I developed the LCBR to adhere to the highest standards of quality, while staying on the forefront of biomarker development and implementation in epidemiology and clinical trial research.

As a biochemist turned molecular epidemiologist, I am interested in the physiological and pathophysiological roles of coagulation, fibrinolysis, fibrosis, and inflammation in several settings, including pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease and stroke, diabetes, dementia, HIV/AIDS and aging. The LCBR performs >100,000 biomarker and genotyping assays annually on tens of thousands of research specimens and houses a major national biorepository with >3M samples from many clinical studies, epidemiological studies, and clinical trials. One of our central hypotheses is that persistent inflammation and immune activation contribute to the increased chronic disease risk observed. We believe this is particularly true in HIV-infected patients on stable ART and in others with chronic infections. One feature of this is that the inflammation is associated with a coagulopathy, leading to increased risk of both arterial and venous thrombosis.

bios_wisniewskiDr. Stephen Wisniewski currently holds several positions at the University of Pittsburgh, which include: Associate Dean for Research in the Graduate School of Public Health, Co-Director in the Epidemiology Data Center, and Professor of Epidemiology (Primary), Psychiatry and Clinical and Translational Sciences.

Dr. Stephen Wisniewski currently holds several positions at the University of Pittsburgh, which include: Associate Dean for Research in the Graduate School of Public Health, Co-Director in the Epidemiology Data Center, and Professor of Epidemiology (Primary), Psychiatry and Clinical and Translational Sciences.

Dr. Wisniewski received his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh in Epidemiology, a Master’s degree from the Ohio State University in Statistics and Bachelor’s degree from the Pennsylvania State University in Mathematics. He is a member of several professional activities, which are the American Statistical Association, Biometric Society, Society for Clinical Trials and the International Society for Quality of Life Research. He is a member of the Delta Omega Society, the honorary society in public health.

Dr. Wisniewski’s primary research interests include the design and analysis of clinical trials and the coordination of multi-center studies. Recently these interests have been applied to the coordination of psychiatric clinical trials (bipolar disorder, treatment resistant depression, chronic depression), pancreatitis, traumatic brain injury and pulmonary disorders.

bios_mannDr. Mann is Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry, is the Program Director and Principal Investigator of the Coagulation Component and responsible for the overall execution of this program. He will directly oversee development of all experimental protocols.

Dr. Mann is Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry, is the Program Director and Principal Investigator of the Coagulation Component and responsible for the overall execution of this program. He will directly oversee development of all experimental protocols.

My research has been in the coagulation field for 44 years; supported by NIH and more recently by the DOD. My program has frequently involved collaborative enterprises (SCOR, P01, T32, RC2) as well as R01 support. This laboratory was the primary analytical center for the initial large scale studies in thrombosis (TIMI 2) and its successors. The successes of these ventures can be attributed to the quality of science but also to attention to the logistics of these large-scale interdisciplinary research enterprises. As Vice-Chairman for Research in the Department of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic, I developed integrated research units in most internal medicine divisions. I have served administrative roles in professional societies including Chair of the Council of the ISTH, Chair of the Council on Thrombosis of the American Heart Association, President of the Association of Medical and Graduate Departments of Biochemistry, Treasurer of FASEB and chair of numerous research and NIH conferences. I have served as an advisor to the Advanced Technology Applications for Combat Casualty Care for over a decade. My research has been recognized by awards from the American Heart Association, the American Society of Hematology, the ISTH, the Hemophilia Society of France and the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society. My colleagues and I have contributed chapters on blood coagulation for major textbooks in hematology, oncology, pediatric hematology, hemophilia and vascular surgery. I believe my expertise in research and interdisciplinary science management is suitable for the role of Project Director of the TACTIC Program.

DoD Trial PIs
bios_sperryI am an Associate Professor with a primary appointment in the Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and General Surgery and secondary appointments in the Department of Critical Care Medicine and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at the University of Pittsburgh.

I am an Associate Professor with a primary appointment in the Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and General Surgery and secondary appointments in the Department of Critical Care Medicine and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at the University of Pittsburgh.

I am a physician trained in general surgery and surgical critical care with a masters’ degree in public health. My research focuses on the elucidation of the mechanisms that are responsible for sex based outcome differences following injury, clinical outcomes following traumatic injury and primarily on massive transfusion, prehospital resuscitation, early correction of the coagulopathy which complicates injury and the ability to predict a complicated post-injury course in the early prehospital and trauma bay setting. I am the Principal investigator for the PAMPer trial and STAAMP trials funded by the Prehospital Use of Plasma in Traumatic Hemorrhage (PUPTH) program and the Tranexamic Acid Clinical Research (TACR) program, under the direction of the Department of The ARMY. I have recently collaborated with my colleagues and published multiple manuscripts which demonstrate the collaborative environment, synergy amongst investigators and the clinical research environment at the University of Pittsburgh, which in addition to my prior clinical research experience and track record, will provide a strong foundation and backdrop to support the requirements for successful completion of the proposed aims of the Clinical Core and Project #3 of the current proposal.

bios_mooreI was the Chief of Trauma Surgery at Denver General Hospital (DGH) for 36 years and Chief of Surgery for 28 years. Due to the mentorship of Dr. John H. Davis, Chairman of Surgery at the University of Vermont during my surgical training, I have always considered basic investigation an essential component of academic trauma surgery.

I was the Chief of Trauma Surgery at Denver General Hospital (DGH) for 36 years and Chief of Surgery for 28 years. Due to the mentorship of Dr. John H. Davis, Chairman of Surgery at the University of Vermont during my surgical training, I have always considered basic investigation an essential component of academic trauma surgery.

These convictions were further strengthened by Dr. Ben Eiseman, Chief of Surgery at DGH, who hired me in 1976 and provided an NIH supported shock/trauma research laboratory. Influenced by the seminal work of Dr. Eiseman, our early studies focused on identifying inflammation and coagulation factors responsible for the development of postinjury multiple organ failure (MOF). In 1986, collaborating with Dr. Alden Harken, then the new Chairman of Surgery at the University of Colorado Denver and Anirban Banerjee, Ph.D., we developed a small animal model of MOF and focused on the role of gut ischemia in the pathogenesis of distant organ injury. This work ultimately became a project within our NIH supported P50 Program Project, “Trauma Primes Cells” initiated in 1992. We have also been fortunate to have an NIH T32 Training Grant since 1991. During my 38 years at Denver Health, I have more than 1450 publications, been editor of the standard text Trauma now in the 7th edition, and am currently editor of the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery.

Basic Science Investigators
bios_mannDr. Mann is Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry, is the Program Director and Principal Investigator of the Coagulation Component and responsible for the overall execution of this program. He will directly oversee development of all experimental protocols.

Dr. Mann is Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry, is the Program Director and Principal Investigator of the Coagulation Component and responsible for the overall execution of this program. He will directly oversee development of all experimental protocols.

My research has been in the coagulation field for 44 years; supported by NIH and more recently by the DOD. My program has frequently involved collaborative enterprises (SCOR, P01, T32, RC2) as well as R01 support. This laboratory was the primary analytical center for the initial large scale studies in thrombosis (TIMI 2) and its successors. The successes of these ventures can be attributed to the quality of science but also to attention to the logistics of these large-scale interdisciplinary research enterprises. As Vice-Chairman for Research in the Department of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic, I developed integrated research units in most internal medicine divisions. I have served administrative roles in professional societies including Chair of the Council of the ISTH, Chair of the Council on Thrombosis of the American Heart Association, President of the Association of Medical and Graduate Departments of Biochemistry, Treasurer of FASEB and chair of numerous research and NIH conferences. I have served as an advisor to the Advanced Technology Applications for Combat Casualty Care for over a decade. My research has been recognized by awards from the American Heart Association, the American Society of Hematology, the ISTH, the Hemophilia Society of France and the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society. My colleagues and I have contributed chapters on blood coagulation for major textbooks in hematology, oncology, pediatric hematology, hemophilia and vascular surgery. I believe my expertise in research and interdisciplinary science management is suitable for the role of Project Director of the TACTIC Program.

bios_butenasDespite the prominent role for TF in various physiological processes, primarily in those related to blood coagulation, there several controversial issues related to the structure and function of natural TF forms existing in vivo.

Despite the prominent role for TF in various physiological processes, primarily in those related to blood coagulation, there several controversial issues related to the structure and function of natural TF forms existing in vivo.

We have been focusing our research on accumulating data, which would expand our knowledge about the relationship between the structure and cell membrane environment and functional properties of natural human TF. In contrast to existing publications, we already showed that posttranslational modifications of TF play a prominent role in TF function. We are going to continue characterizing the contribution of modifications of various forms of TF (both recombinant and purified from human tissues and cells) on the activity using various systems, ranging from one enzyme/one substrate to fresh blood. We are also going to continue identifying and characterizing the components of monocytic cell membranes responsible for the high activity of TF localized on the surface of polysaccharide-stimulated monocytes. TF and factor XIa activity has been identified in plasma from patients with trauma and various cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Some correlations between the presence of these two proteins in patients with the severity of trauma or disease have been observed. We are going to evaluate whether the presence and concentration of factor XIa could be used as a marker of trauma severity and to elucidate the mechanism of factor XIa generation in vivo. I believe that a successful completion of the proposed research could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of traumatic coagulopathy and to a more efficient treatment of trauma patients.

bios_brassLawrence (Skip) Brass, MD PhD is a graduate of Harvard College and Case Western Reserve University, where he received his MD and a PhD in biochemistry. After residency training in internal medicine he became a fellow in Hematology-Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania where he served as Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine from 2004 to 2007, and is currently Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology.

Lawrence (Skip) Brass, MD PhD is a graduate of Harvard College and Case Western Reserve University, where he received his MD and a PhD in biochemistry. After residency training in internal medicine he became a fellow in Hematology-Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania where he served as Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine from 2004 to 2007, and is currently Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology.

Dr. Brass became Associate Dean for Combined Degree and Physician Scholars Programs and Director of Penn’s Medical Scientist Training Program in 1998. He has been active at the national level in the development of training programs for physician-scientists and has served as President of the National Association of MD-PhD Programs, Chair of the AAMC GREAT section on MD-PhD training, and was a member of the NIH Physician-Scientist Workforce advisory group in 2013-2014. He is also a practicing hematologist whose research interests are in the fields of hemostasis and vascular biology. He has been continuously funded by the NIH HLBI since the mid-1980’s, has been elected to membership in the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, was an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association and is a recipient of the Distinguished Career Award from the International Society of Hemostasis and Thrombosis, the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania, and numerous teaching awards from students at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

bios_diamondScott L. Diamond, Ph.D. (B.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., Rice University) is the founding director of the Penn Center for Molecular Discovery. He is the Arthur E. Humphrey Professor and Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Scott L. Diamond, Ph.D. (B.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., Rice University) is the founding director of the Penn Center for Molecular Discovery. He is the Arthur E. Humphrey Professor and Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Dr. Diamond researches biotechnologies in several key areas: endothelial mechanobiology, blood clot dissolving therapies, blood systems biology, nonviral gene therapy, and high throughput drug discovery. He has produced over 180 publications and patents and has served on advisory committees to NSF, NIH, AHA, and NASA, and has consulted extensively for industry and government. Diamond is the recipient of the NSF National Young Investigator Award, the NIH FIRST Award, the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award, the AIChE Allan P. Colburn Award, and the George Heilmeier Excellence in Research Award. Dr. Diamond is an elected Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). Currently, Dr. Diamond is the Director of the Penn Biotechnology Masters Program, one of the largest in the country with more than 130 students. Dr. Diamond also serves as Associate Director of the Institute for Medicine and Engineering (IME).

bios_banerjeeI have been a founding member of this program since its inception in 1992 under the visionary leadership of Dr. Alden Harken. Our goals were to create successful surgical Investigators to tackle the challenges of surgical biology. I am proud that >70% of our trainees are in academia.

I have been a founding member of this program since its inception in 1992 under the visionary leadership of Dr. Alden Harken. Our goals were to create successful surgical Investigators to tackle the challenges of surgical biology. I am proud that >70% of our trainees are in academia.

For long the sole basic scientist (full time) on our team, I have had the most direct contact with surgical trainees and developed respect and understanding about tailoring the training experience for individual fellows. In the process, their enthusiasm and curiosity has often led our research into unexpected areas. My deeper role has been to inculcate a sense of scientific philosophy, critical thinking and selecting hypothesis for testing (bang for buck).

Following my training in NMR biophysics and chemistry, I have constantly developed quantitative methods for surgical research. These include fluorescence imaging, MS proteomics and recently MSmetabolomics, as well as thrombolastography. Utilizing these modern methods on patient samples has enabled these trainees to gain confidence in tackling challenging surgical questions.

As basic scientist unable to contribute directly to patient care, I feel privileged and gratified to participate in the training of a next generation of care-givers. For me, the importance of trauma to modern society and its remarkable complexity constitute the forefront of scientific research today. With over two decades of experience, I believe I am better positioned than ever before to insert talented individuals into rewarding careers.

bios_mooreI was the Chief of Trauma Surgery at Denver General Hospital (DGH) for 36 years and Chief of Surgery for 28 years. Due to the mentorship of Dr. John H. Davis, Chairman of Surgery at the University of Vermont during my surgical training, I have always considered basic investigation an essential component of academic trauma surgery.

I was the Chief of Trauma Surgery at Denver General Hospital (DGH) for 36 years and Chief of Surgery for 28 years. Due to the mentorship of Dr. John H. Davis, Chairman of Surgery at the University of Vermont during my surgical training, I have always considered basic investigation an essential component of academic trauma surgery.

These convictions were further strengthened by Dr. Ben Eiseman, Chief of Surgery at DGH, who hired me in 1976 and provided an NIH supported shock/trauma research laboratory. Influenced by the seminal work of Dr. Eiseman, our early studies focused on identifying inflammation and coagulation factors responsible for the development of postinjury multiple organ failure (MOF). In 1986, collaborating with Dr. Alden Harken, then the new Chairman of Surgery at the University of Colorado Denver and Anirban Banerjee, Ph.D., we developed a small animal model of MOF and focused on the role of gut ischemia in the pathogenesis of distant organ injury. This work ultimately became a project within our NIH supported P50 Program Project, “Trauma Primes Cells” initiated in 1992. We have also been fortunate to have an NIH T32 Training Grant since 1991. During my 38 years at Denver Health, I have more than 1450 publications, been editor of the standard text Trauma now in the 7th edition, and am currently editor of the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery.

bios_rufMy research at the Scripps Research Institute has been focused on studying the extrinsic tissue factor (TF) coagulation pathway for more than 25 years. Throughout my career, I have been continuously involved in larger collaborative programs, in addition to my own investigator initiated research.

My research at the Scripps Research Institute has been focused on studying the extrinsic tissue factor (TF) coagulation pathway for more than 25 years. Throughout my career, I have been continuously involved in larger collaborative programs, in addition to my own investigator initiated research.

I was Program Director of a NIH Postdoctoral Training grant and have trained more than 30 Postdoctoral Fellows. I have been active in professional societies, program committees and review and advisory panels in the field of thrombosis and vascular biology. My diverse research program in different aspects of thrombosis, hemostasis and related areas provide unique qualifications to participate in multidisciplinary programs to identify and validate pathogenetic mechanisms of the coagulation and hemostatic system in translational medicine.

bios_esmonI have experience in coagulation, inflammation, vascular biology and particularly the protein C pathway. We routinely develop new assays and antibodies useful for such investigations.

I have experience in coagulation, inflammation, vascular biology and particularly the protein C pathway. We routinely develop new assays and antibodies useful for such investigations.

We identified histones as major mediators of sepsis, activated protein C as a critical regulator of the septic response and have identified a number of approaches to interrupt complex disease progression. We have generated a battery of antibodies to interfere with histone mediated toxicity and have antibodies that block protein C completely or selectively inhibit the anticoagulant function. In collaborative studies, we have that shown high levels of histones in trauma patients correlate with poor outcome. I have experience as head of the cardiovascular biology and coagulation biology program, I have been head of program projects and participated in SCOR grants and my laboratory is accustomed to working collaboratively with laboratories at different universities around the world. I am currently the principal investigator of the inflammation component of the TACTIC grant (#UM1 HL120877) studying trauma-induced coagulopathy.

bios_nelsonThe overall goal of the research in Dr. Nelson’s laboratory is to understand the control of smooth muscle and endothelial cell function by ion channels and calcium signaling. One major goal is to understand how sympathetic nerves, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells communicate (“vascular crosstalk”) to control the function of resistance-sized peripheral arteries.

The overall goal of the research in Dr. Nelson’s laboratory is to understand the control of smooth muscle and endothelial cell function by ion channels and calcium signaling. One major goal is to understand how sympathetic nerves, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells communicate (“vascular crosstalk”) to control the function of resistance-sized peripheral arteries.

We have made a number of important contributions to this field including the first evidence that expression of endothelial cell SK3 channels modulates blood pressure (Taylor et al., Circ Res, 2003), the first measurements of local IP3-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) at the myoendothelial projections (Ledoux et al., PNAS, 2008) and of elementary Ca2+ signals (“sparklets”) through single TRPV4 channels (Sonkusare et al., Science, 2012). Approaches cover the spectrum from molecular, cellular, intact tissue, whole organ and in vivo (local CBF, blood pressure). A number of genetic mouse models are used to unravel control mechanisms. Relevant ion channels in smooth muscle and endothelium are being explored, including voltage-dependent calcium channels, inward rectifier potassium channels, calcium-sensitive BK, IK, SK channels, voltage-dependent potassium channels, ATP-sensitive potassium channels, TRPV4 channels, ryanodine receptor channels, IP3R channels, and P2X1 receptor channels. The ultimate objectives are to understand the basic mechanisms for ion channel control of vascular function, and using this information to understand pathologies and possible new therapeutic interventions.

bios_morrisseyDr. James Morrissey is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds the Roy & Eva Hong Professorship in Molecular & Cellular Biology. Dr. Morrissey received his Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego and did postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford and the Scripps Research Foundation.

Dr. James Morrissey is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds the Roy & Eva Hong Professorship in Molecular & Cellular Biology. Dr. Morrissey received his Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego and did postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford and the Scripps Research Foundation.

Starting with cloning of tissue factor in 1987, Dr. Morrissey’s research has centered on regulation of the blood clotting system in normal hemostasis and thrombotic diseases. These studies initially focused on basic biochemical mechanisms in the blood clotting system, but over time several of his discoveries have prompted translational studies in both animal models and human clinical studies. In 2006, his laboratory discovered that inorganic polyphosphate, which is released from activated human platelets, is a potent modulator of the blood clotting system at the nexus of hemostasis, thrombosis and inflammation. The work from his lab has led to a number of spin-offs with potential clinical applications, including novel clinical assays for markers of thrombotic risk, hemostatic agents for treating bleeding, and anti-inflammatory/anti-thrombotic agents with potential for reduced bleeding side effects.

Dr. Morrissey is a member of several profession societies and serves on the Council of the International Society of Thrombosis & Haemostasis (ISTH). His awards and named lectureships include an Established Investigatorship from the American Heart Association, the Owren Lecture (University of Oslo), the Theodore Spaet Memorial Lecture (Montefiore Medical Center), Biennial Investigator Recognition Award for Contributions to Haemostasis (ISTH), and the Sol Sherry Distinguished Lecture in Thrombosis (American Heart Association). He has published more than 170 scientific papers and has served on the editorial boards of several journals including the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Blood, and Thrombosis and Haemostasis. He is the inventor on 16 U.S. patents, several of which have been licensed in the field of diagnostics for hemostasis and thrombosis.

bios_parkI am a trauma/critical care surgeon and laboratorian with postdoctoral training in clinical research design and analysis, and protein chemistry of coagulation. For over 10 years, I have been the PI of extramurally-funded research programs that investigate trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC), which is commonly observed in the acutely injured patients.

I am a trauma/critical care surgeon and laboratorian with postdoctoral training in clinical research design and analysis, and protein chemistry of coagulation. For over 10 years, I have been the PI of extramurally-funded research programs that investigate trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC), which is commonly observed in the acutely injured patients.

This interest in better understanding the underlying mechanisms of TIC was strengthened over the years during my two deployments to Iraq while serving in the U.S. Air Force. I am grateful for the opportunity to take care of many U.S. casualties and local nationals suffering from severe ballistic injuries to the head and torso. My clinical experience cemented my desire to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying hyper- and hypo-coagulopathy we observe in the injured patients. When I began working at Mayo Clinic, I laid the groundwork for developing a basic science program within our Trauma Center. After securing extramural funding, I set up a trauma research program by training research technologists, research coordinators in the performance of coagulation assays and enrollment of trauma patients. I designed and recently completed a 4-year, prospective case-cohort study that enrolled over 1300 acute trauma patients, including collection of serial blood samples. I oversaw the quality control of blood sample collection, processing, transport and storage, and directed coagulation biomarker assay development, quality control and data editing. This experience has given me tremendous opportunity to appreciate the dedication and patience needed to transition novel laboratory tools to patient’s bedside. The current application is in direct alignment with the work I have been involved as a clinician engaged in research.

bios_blankBrian Zuckerbraun, MD has a history of basic science investigations involving heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide signaling as well as the development of carbon monoxide as a therapeutic agent.

Brian Zuckerbraun, MD has a history of basic science investigations involving heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide signaling as well as the development of carbon monoxide as a therapeutic agent.

His investigations have focused on organ injury from hemorrhagic shock or infection. Specifically, much of his work now focuses on the mitochondrial adaptive responses and regulation of innate immune response to pathogens and products of tissue injury, as well as the role of autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis to prevent organ injury in trauma and sepsis. Dr. Zuckerbraun clinically works as a Trauma and Acute Care Surgeon at UPMC and a General Surgeon at the VAPHS. He has collaborated extensively with other investigators on the Trauma Research Center Grant.

bios_nealMy lab focuses on understanding the mechanisms of hemostasis and coagulation following trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death in trauma, which accounts for nearly 10% of annual mortality worldwide.

My lab focuses on understanding the mechanisms of hemostasis and coagulation following trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death in trauma, which accounts for nearly 10% of annual mortality worldwide.

Over 25% of severely injured patients will present with impaired coagulation which increases morbidity and mortality. Although it is well known that trauma results in a profound inflammatory response driven by innate immune activation, the mechanisms of this acute coagulopathy of trauma are poorly understood. Our lab has recently discovered a potential link between sterile inflammation and impaired coagulation through expression of the innate immune receptor, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on platelets. In our current work, we seek to identify novel platelet signaling mechanisms that contribute to platelet dysfunction and coagulopathy following trauma. Specifically, we have identified that the endogenous danger signaling molecule and TLR4 ligand, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is expressed on platelets and has a unique role in the regulation of platelet aggregation following injury. We now seek to understand how HMGB1 release by platelets is regulated and are testing multiple drug targets for regulating HMGB1 release and attenuating platelet dysfunction following trauma. In addition to HMGB1, a number of other danger signaling molecules are under investigation. The lab collaborates closely with local and international platelet experts, including the lab of Meinrad Gawaz, MD in Tubingen, Germany. The lab also works closely with Dr. Simon Watkins, Professor and Vice-Chair of Cell Biology and Director of the Center for Biological Imaging as well as numerous collaborators with expertise in the related fields. This multi-disciplinary collaboration combines international experts in platelet biology, coagulopathy, cellular imaging, and innate immune signaling to create a team well suited to this complex problem.

External Advisory Committee
bios_aledortDr. Louis Aledort has been the Mary Weinfeld Professor of Clinical Research in Hemophilia at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, USA since 1993. He joined the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1966, and was the Scientist-in-Residence at the New School University.

Dr. Louis Aledort has been the Mary Weinfeld Professor of Clinical Research in Hemophilia at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, USA since 1993. He joined the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1966, and was the Scientist-in-Residence at the New School University.

Dr. Aledort received his Doctor of Medicine in 1959 at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and in 1955 achieved a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry at Queens College of the City of New York.

Dr. Aledort has been a member of the Practice Committee of the American College of Physicians since 2001. In 2002 he became a member of the editorial board for two prestigious publications; Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis and American Journal of Hematology. Since 1968, Dr Aledort has been a professional member of the American Society of Hematology, the New York Society for the Study of Blood and the International Society of Hematology.

In 2010, Dr. Aledort received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Hemophilia and Thrombosis Research Society (HTRS). In 2014, Dr. Aledort received an Honorary Doctorate in Medicine from Lund University.

bios_jamesDr. Andra H. James is a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and the John M. Nokes Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Virginia.

Dr. Andra H. James is a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and the John M. Nokes Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Virginia.

Her practice, research and publications pertain to reproductive issues among women with bleeding and clotting disorders. She is involved both nationally and internationally in activities to improve healthcare for women with bleeding and clotting disorders. She was recently a special advisor to the Director of the Division of Blood Diseases and Resources at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. She currently serves on the Medical Advisory Committee of the Platelet Disorders Support Association, the Medical and Scientific Advisory Board of the National Blood Clot Alliance and is president of the Foundation for Women and Girls with Blood Disorders.

bios_brohiKarim Brohi is Professor of Trauma Sciences at Barts and the London School of Medicine, and Consultant in Trauma & Vascular surgery at the Royal London Hospital, the UK’s busiest major trauma centre. He attended medical school at University College London and has trained in London, Oxford, Cape Town and San Francisco General Hospital. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and Fellow of the Royal College of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

Karim Brohi is Professor of Trauma Sciences at Barts and the London School of Medicine, and Consultant in Trauma & Vascular surgery at the Royal London Hospital, the UK’s busiest major trauma centre. He attended medical school at University College London and has trained in London, Oxford, Cape Town and San Francisco General Hospital. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and Fellow of the Royal College of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

Karim leads an active research programme at Queen Mary University of London and is the director for the newly formed Centre for Trauma Sciences. He has particular academic interests in acute translational trauma care, and in particular the management of severe bleeding. He also conducts research into post-injury inflammation; severe and complex outcomes after trauma; and is the lead for several translational trauma clinical trials.

He is the director of the London Major Trauma System, which provides injury care for a population of over 15 million people. He chaired the guideline development group for the NICE Major Trauma Guidelines and is a member of the national clinical reference group for trauma.

Karim is also the founder of the Trauma.org web site and Trauma-list email discussion group, both now in their 15th year and with a 25,000-strong global membership.

bios_lawsonJeffrey H. Lawson, M.D., Ph.D. received his medical degree and a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the University of Vermont in Burlington. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Biochemistry at the same location prior to his residency in General and Thoracic surgery and a fellowship in Vascular Surgery at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.

Jeffrey H. Lawson, M.D., Ph.D. received his medical degree and a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the University of Vermont in Burlington.  He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Biochemistry at the same location prior to his residency in General and Thoracic surgery and a fellowship in Vascular Surgery at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.

Dr. Lawson is Professor of Surgery and Professor of Pathology at Duke University Medical Center, where he is also Director of the Vascular Research Laboratory, Medical Director of Surgery Clinical Research Unit within the Department of Surgery, Program Director of the General Surgery Resident Research Program for the Department of Surgery, and Director of Clinical Trials in Vascular Surgery.

Dr. Lawson is on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Vascular Access and serves as an ad hoc reviewer for numerous hemostasis, vascular, and surgical journals.  He has authored over 200 journal articles and abstracts on the topics of hemostasis and vascular surgery, and also lectures on these topics both nationally and internationally.  Dr. Lawson is a member of the Councils on Cardiovascular Surgery and Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology for the American Heart Association and cofounder and board member for the Vascular Access Society of the Americas.  Over the past five years, Dr. Lawson’s research laboratory has been funded by the NIH, and various biotechnology companies in the areas of hemostasis, vascular surgery and vascular biology.